Tag Archives: DNS ordering

Internet access slowness on host after installing Windows 10 Client Hyper-V

I’ve recently switched from VMware Workstation to Windows 10 Client Hyper-V and I really pleased with capabilities I get so far. But after awhile I noticed extreme sluggishness of web browsing on my host machine which I had not linked initially with Hyper-V. Issue has not crop up immediately after I installed and started using it, but seemingly after I added Internal Virtual Switch. So I spend day and a half blaming slowness on my ISP before trying to investigate and fix the problem.

In case if you not recognize whether you have the same problem or not here is somebody’s YouTube video demonstrating it along with fix valid for Window 8/8.1 (note that adapter names may vary from case to case). Windows 10 fix can be found below.

Essentially when you create External Hyper-V switch it sorts of hijacks your physical NIC unbinds IPv4 from it and passes its IPv4 config onto External vEthernet adapter in some obscure way. But slowness crops up due to the wrong connections priority which was easy to adjust in Win 8 as described in this TechNet blog post – you just navigate to Network Connections (ncpa.cpl) > Press Alt on keyboard to access Advanced Settings as depicted below and from there just reorder your connections making sure that External vEthernet adapter is listed first.

Problem is that in Windows 10 you no longer have this GUI because as one person put it “There are no longer any components that utilize the binding order. The only known component that used the binding order was DNS ordering. By default, Windows uses the Route Metric + Interface Metric to determine which route has the highest priority by choosing the route with the lowest value.” This is explanation which I got here.

Long story short what you likely have to do to bring your browsing speed back to normal is issue Get-NetIPInterface cmdlet to get list of your interfaces along with their Index and Interface Metric values. It should return you something like this:

Get-NetIPInterface

Now you want to make sure that your vEthernet gets highest priority by issuing the following cmdlet:

Set-NetIPInterface -InterfaceIndex "xx" -InterfaceMetric "xxx"

If I use example with interfaces listed above it would be something like this:

Set-NetIPInterface -InterfaceIndex "14" -InterfaceMetric "85"

This should fix your browsing speed.

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