Category Archives: Windows Server

Windows Server 2016: CDPUserSvc has stopped working

You may observe the following error on Windows Server 2016 immediately after OS startup:

CDPUUserSvc_65df7 has stopped working

This “has stopped working” part tells us that some unhandled exception occurred, so we can switch over to Event Viewer to find some more details about it:

svchost.exe_CDPUserSvc_65df7 – Exception code: 0xc0000005

Exception details are the following:

Faulting application name: svchost.exe_CDPUserSvc_65df7, version: 10.0.14393.0, time stamp: 0x57899b1c
Faulting module name: cdp.dll, version: 10.0.14393.1715, time stamp: 0x59b0d38c
Exception code: 0xc0000005
Fault offset: 0x0000000000193cf5
Faulting process id: 0x1b14

After quick research I found out that this error was introduced with some Microsoft updates and to resolve it on Windows Server 2016 14393.1884 you just need to apply another update 🙂 More specifically you need to install KB4053579, which can be downloaded from Windows Update Catalog. Applying this update resolves this error.

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GAC folders

I keep forgetting exact GAC folders’ locations and whenever I try to Google this information it is always buried under some layers of misunderstanding and confused discussions. This steams from the fact that there are different locations depending on .NET version and bitness of your assemblies. So I’m just jotting down all the locations here for quick reference:

.NET 2.0 GAC:  C:\Windows\assembly

.NET 4.0 GAC: C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\assembly

Now each of this folder has the following sub-folders:

GAC_32 for 32-bit assemblies (defines word size)

GAC_64 for 64-bit assemblies  (defines word size)

GAC_MSIL for assemblies that can be run in either 32-bit or 64-bit mode which are JIT compiled to the required word size as needed

On machines with x86/32-bit version of Windows (which is way too rare now, especially for Windows Server) there is only GAC_32 subfolder, and on x64 OS machines there are both GAC_32 and GAC_64 folders as 32-bit code is supported via emulation (WOW32).

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Configuring Windows Server 2016 Core Domain Controller

In Windows Server 2016 you no longer have an opportunity to switch back and forth between core and GUI installation, hence you cannot do install and configure AD DS in a lazy way (using full GUI) and then convert it to core. That was something I discovered hard way long time ago – so I already have separate VHDX templates for Server 2016 core and full GUI VMs.

But it has been quite a while since I was playing with Server Core so when I starting provisioning my new Server 2016 core domain controller VMs today I realized that I need to remember quite a few commands to fully install AD DS on Server Core. I was about to create a blog post listing essential commands, but actually found very well written blog post on TechNet covering exactly that: Chad’s Quick Notes – Installing a Domain Controller with Server 2016 Core. So just sharing it here, instead of writing the same myself 🙂

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Getting Hyper-V guest OS information without logging in to guest OS/VM

The other day it was necessary for me to confirm Windows OS build in  Hyper-V guest VM without logging in into it. I simply received VM from the client but no credentials which I could use, but it was necessary to quickly confirm guest OS build. I was certain that there is a way to query such data from Hyper-V host without logging into guest and with no credentials. After some googling I was not able to find some simple command or one liner to pull this data (opening PS session into VM was not an option as it requires credentials), but I’ve found good function which does exactly what I need on Yusuf Öztürk blog, here it is:

Once you have this function, you can use it like this:

Get-VMGuestInfo VMNAME -HyperVHost HyperVHostName

Sample output from this function:

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How to install and manage Nano Server

My 2nd article about new Windows Server 2016 installation option “Nano Server” is now available @StarWind Blog. In my previous article, I covered general concepts around Nano Server, in this one I talk about more practical aspects: installation and management. At the end of the day, you would agree that the best way to learn new technology it is try to use it – this way you will be exposed to its strengths and weaknesses directly, and can get real understanding of whether it works for you or not. Though at this point even Microsoft admits that despite all its greatness, at the moment, Nano Server has quite limited utility as it supports only a small subset of roles and features out of those which you can find in full GUI version of Windows Server.

Read more @StarWind Blog…

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