Category Archives: K2

Start multiple workflow instances with PowerShell

You can find sample PowerShell script for starting multiple process instances in K2 Developer Reference, below you can find just slightly modified version which I am normally using. I’ve only added some variables to specify desired number of instances, project and workflow name along with folio value.

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Unable to add/remove K2 Environment Fields – “You are not authorized to perform the requested operation”

In certain scenarios (for example, when you changed your K2 administrative accounts) you may see the following error when trying to add or remove Environment Field in Environment Library:

You are not authorized to perform the requested operation

This may happen even for user which has been assigned K2 Administrator role in Setup Manager when custom security was configured on Environment Library and it didn’t include this specific account.

To resolve this (providing you have account with administrative rights) just look into Security settings available under list of variables themselves when you navigate to Environment Library > %Environment Library Name%:

Environment Variable Security Settings

Just add required user assigning him Modify rights to resolve this issue.

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K2 Mobile Applications – Updated landing page

It used to be somewhat confusing with two mobile apps (K2 Workspace and K2 Mobile) for two platforms (iOS and Android), but recently updated K2 Mobile Applications help landing page makes things clear right off the bat making it easy for you to navigate to the right information:

K2 Mobile Applications Documentation Landing Page – App Version and Platform selection

There is also couple of useful links on the bottom of new landing page, namely Distributing K2 Mobile Application with MDM and K2 Mobile Support Policy:


K2 Mobile Applications Documentation Landing Page – Additional Resources

Really good job on K2 documentation team side 🙂 I really see that product documentation becomes better and easier to use.

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Unable to connect to named SQL instance on remote machine

Recently I was doing installation of K2 5.2 on Azure VMs with SQL server named instance hosted on separate Azure VM. I’ve created SQL Server alias on K2 VM but then run into issue – neither K2 Setup Manager nor SSMS were able to connect to SQL through alias. I next tried direct connection via server\instance name which also failed. SSMS showed me the following error:

Could not open a connection to SQL Server. Microsoft SQL Server, Error: 53

I first focused on network connectivity between VM:

  • Confirmed that I can ping SQL Server VM from K2 Server VM
  • Confirmed that no firewall enabled on VM and Azure VMs on the same network with nothing blocking connectivity between them
  • I tried to use telnet to test port 1433 – it failed

This is what kept me focused on network connectivity layer a bit longer then necessary. But after confirming that SQL Server not listening on port 1433 using netstat -na | find “1433” it became quite clear that focus should be on SQL Server configuration. First of all – by default named instance listen on dynamic port, and you actually need to have SQL Server Browser Service enabled to ensure you can connect to named instance without specifying port while using dynamic ports. But in my case it was not that as in SQL Server configuration there was explicitly specified custom port (SQL Server Configuration Manager > Protocols for %INSTANCE_NAME% > TCP/IP Properties > TCP Dynamic Ports – if you have anything other than 0 in IPAll section fir this setting you are not using dynamic ports). When your problem is dynamic ports and disabled SQL Server Browser Service error message from SSMS looks as follows:

SQL Network Interfaces, error: 26 – Error Locating Server/Instance Specified

As you can see error message explicitly tells you “Error Locating Server/Instance Specified. To fix this either set 0 for TCP Dynamic Ports setting and enable SQL Server Browser Service or specify some port number there. You sort of choosing your dependency here – either browser service (may fail to start) or custom port (may be hijacked by other service). It seems that browser service is better approach.

So in my case I was confused by expecting named instance to listen on default port which was, to put it simply, wrong expectation. Here is how you can check on which port your instance is listening:

Commands which you can use to find out your SQL Server instance ports

But obviously having access to SQL Server you can get this data from SQL Server Configuration manager too: SQL Server Configuration Manager > Protocols for %INSTANCE_NAME% > TCP/IP Properties. Just keep in mind that you need to check TCP Dynamic Ports value both for specific address and for IPAll section. But like I said in my case, the problem was not about ports. Once I found out instance port I noticed that I still cannot connect to it using telnet, just because IP address was not enabled in SQL Server Configuration Manager > Protocols for %INSTANCE_NAME% > TCP/IP Properties (meaning it had Enabled=0). I corrected that and telnet connectivity test succeeded.
Still, when I get back to SSMS I was getting the same error – “Could not open a connection to SQL Server. Microsoft SQL Server, Error: 53”. Reason? With SQL Server 2016 and latest versions of SQL Server, I keep forgetting that the latest and greatest version of SSMS still reads alias settings from x86 registry hive (meaning you need to configure SQL alias using cliconfg.exe from C:\Windows\SysWOW64) – I have a hard time getting use to it. Interestingly fully missing x86 alias triggers error message “Could not open a connection to SQL Server. Microsoft SQL Server, Error: 53” while one we configure with non existing server or instance name will give you “SQL Network Interfaces, error: 26 – Error Locating Server/Instance Specified”.

Anyhow your key takeaways from this post should be:

  • Know your instance port
  • Make sure that IP address is enabled
  • We still need to configure alias twice (x86/x64) to avoid unpleasant surprises from apps reading setting from non-configured location

I hope this post may save some troubleshooting time for someone.

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First blog post for 2019 + new K2 blog announcement

I guess I’m a bit late for writing posts of the “looking back at 2018” and “new year resolutions for 2019” type as through the relevant time period I was busy migrating my blog from premium shared hosting provider to cloud hosting. The reason for the move was former provider inflexibility with payment options (I was OK with high price tag but was not OK with their desire of receiving it all upfront). Migration process involved some silly mistakes and forced WordPress internals learning, but I finally managed to resolve all issues and get my blog up and running (now with HTTPS 🙂 ).

I also keep writing blog posts for StarWind Blog, and recent one was about SharePoint 2019 installation. But something which may qualify for bigger of my NY resolutions for 2019 is a new blog about K2 which I’m going to do completely in Spanish. I don’t plan to put huge amount of content there very fast and probably will be also translating some of my old K2 related posts into Spanish. You can already bookmark new site address – k2bpm.es and stay tuned for new posts which will arrive as soon as I write them 🙂

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