Category Archives: Personal

Starting my preparation for 98-375 exam

It has been a while since I had taken any Microsoft exam as there were rather a lot of other things happening. Finally I’ve decided to get back to certification and learning and this time it will be “fundamentals”/MTA level exam yet on topic quite new to me which will allow me to learn quite a few things. Exam I will be taking this time is Microsoft 98-375: HTML5 Application Development Fundamentals and I will probably combine prepping to this exam with doing Harvard’s CS50’s Web Programming with Python and JavaScript course on edX.

Just for tracking I’m posting my very first practice test exam attempt results below (results I’ve got more or less expected for attempt taken without any preparation at all):

98-375 practice exam attempt without preparation 🙂

As you can see exam topics grouped in 4 blocks: Code by Using JavaScript, Format the UI by Using CSS, Manage the Application Life Cycle, Build the UI by using HTML5 – quite interesting set of things to explore.

You can expect some related posts about this exam and related topics as I go through exam preparation process.

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Creating Hyper-V VM with Ubuntu Server

I’ve recently decided to learn a bit about Ubuntu and going to do some project based on this platform, hence this little post describing how to create Ubuntu Server Hyper-V VM.

First of all, you need to download latest Ubuntu Server installation media from here, selecting between LTS (Long Term Support) and regular version:

LTS version is more tested and enterprise focused version which is released every 2 years and has 5 years support cycle.

Once you have installation media you just need to create Hyper-V VM allocating desired quantity of resources to it (note that this OS has quite humble minimum requirements) and make your VM Generation choice.

Despite the fact that process of creating VM is more or less the same for any OS I decided to write down all the steps involved into setting up Ubuntu Server VM.

You can follow these steps to create your own Hyper-V VM with Ubuntu Server OS. Right click on your Hyper-V host and select New > Virtual Machine:

Just click Next on Before You Begin page:

Specify name and location for your VM (be sure to specify your preferred VMs folder, VM specific subfolder will be created automatically based on VM name you type in):

Select Generation of your VM (note this cannot be changed once VM is created):

I wanted Generation 2 VM so I’ve selected this option (refer to MSFT documentation for information on choosing VM generation). Note that for Ubuntu VM you need to disable secure boot feature which will be enabled by default on Generation 2 VM.

Assign desired amount of memory and decide whether Dynamic Memory should be used:

Select virtual switch:

Adjust VHD settings if necessary:

Specify path to Ubunto ISO file you downloaded earlier:

Review selection you made and click on Finish:

Disable Secure Boot before powering on your VM – otherwise your VM fail to boot (as per MSFT documentation: “some Linux virtual machines will not boot unless the secure boot option is disabled”):

And while you are still in VM properties I would recommend you to disable automatic checkpoints (unless you want to use them):

Once you start VM setup process will be initiated automatically:

You will need to select preferred language:

Then keyboard settings:

And next, select Install Ubuntu option:

Accept default network connections settings:

And leave your proxy settings empty (unless you are using proxy server):

Accept default archive mirror address and hit Done:

Accept defaults on filesystem setup (which will mean use entire disk for our installation):

Select disc or accept selection if you have just one:

Accept default filesystem settings on the next page:

Agree with formatting selected drive (data loss warning):

Specify profile settings and server name (note that only small letters accepted for server and user names – great example of explicitness which leaves no chance for you to grown up into proficient user thinking that some case insensitive objects are case sensitive – happens way too often in more thanks to some user friendly OSs):

Select whether you want to install OpenSSH server:

Select any additional packages you may want to install:

Wait till installation go through remaining steps:

Hit Reboot Now once installation completes:

Once VM reboot completes you will be prompted to remove installation medium and hit ENTER (Hyper-V should auto remove it for you):

Once reboot completes Ubuntu Server should start and meet you with credentials prompt:

Once you type in your login and password correctly you will be invited to enter commands (no GUI installed on Server version by default):

At this point I suggest you to shutdown VM with shutdown -P now command and make your baseline VM snapshot.

Last do couple of more things before we wrap off our VM setup process. Let’s first install updates using sudo apt-get update (to fetch the list of available updates) and sudo apt-get upgrade (to upgrade installed packages):

And last but not least, let’s add GUI to our server – for that just use sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop confirming that you want to continue on additional space usage requirement consent step. Once setup completes you need to reboot your VM and it will start in GUI mode:

After clicking on your user icon, type in your password and click Sign In:

You will be presented with What’s new in Ubuntu splash screen:

This concludes VM installation and configuration process. Stay tuned for the new posts as I’m going to keep using this VM and documenting installation and configuration of additional packages and other things.

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First blog post for 2019 + new K2 blog announcement

I guess I’m a bit late for writing posts of the “looking back at 2018” and “new year resolutions for 2019” type as through the relevant time period I was busy migrating my blog from premium shared hosting provider to cloud hosting. The reason for the move was former provider inflexibility with payment options (I was OK with high price tag but was not OK with their desire of receiving it all upfront). Migration process involved some silly mistakes and forced WordPress internals learning, but I finally managed to resolve all issues and get my blog up and running (now with HTTPS 🙂 ).

I also keep writing blog posts for StarWind Blog, and recent one was about SharePoint 2019 installation. But something which may qualify for bigger of my NY resolutions for 2019 is a new blog about K2 which I’m going to do completely in Spanish. I don’t plan to put huge amount of content there very fast and probably will be also translating some of my old K2 related posts into Spanish. You can already bookmark new site address – k2bpm.es and stay tuned for new posts which will arrive as soon as I write them 🙂

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Un mercenario al que pagas bien no te deja en la estacada

I haven’t been writing any language learning related blog posts for quite some time now. It is not because there is nothing to write about, on the contrary I have a lot of ideas big and small in language learning department, but I’m too busy with technology/work and other things.

Anyhow I’m very actively learn Spanish language and the moment, keeping on hold French and Afrikaans and postponing desire to learn other languages 🙂 I’m about to receive (unless I failed my exam) my DELE B1 certificate. Subjectively I can say that my writing capability still requires a lot of work as well as speaking lacks control of tense system though I can say a lot using limited amount of tenses and doing a lot of mistakes 🙂

My learning strategy includes loads of input from day-0 (listening, reading) and I’m currently reading “La carta esférica” by Arturo Pérez-Reverte and in this book I stumbled upon the following idiomatic expression – “dejar a alguien en la estacada”. Here is the passage from the book:

Además, siempre preferí contratar a asalariados eficientes antes que a voluntarios entusiastas… Un mercenario al que pagas bien no te deja en la estacada.

Pérez-Reverte, Arturo. La carta esférica (Spanish Edition) (Kindle Location 3386). Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial España. Kindle Edition.

So I decided to read up a bit on the phrase and below you may find what I learnt. Disclaimer: most of the post talks about etymologies of phrases/words and these are frequently contested, I  have to warn you that I didn’t do rigorous scientific check/verification and you are more than welcome do double check these theories. 🙂

I quickly found English equivalent for this expression – “to leave someone in the lurch”, and while meaning was clear both expressions required some extra checks in dictionary to understand where they came from. So basic modern meaning of both expressions is to abandon someone in difficult situation.

Let’s start from the Spanish one – “dejar a alguien en la estacada” if you are in a mood for definition of meaning in Spanish here you are – “La expresión ‘Dejar a alguien en la estacada’ es comúnmente utilizada para señalar cuando a una persona se la ha dejado abandonada a su suerte en una situación que podría ser peligrosa, apurada o de difícil solución, no brindándole la ayuda o auxilio que precisa” (source). But what is this “estacada” where our troubled person left? It actually comes from medieval jousting tournaments, martial game based on the military use of the lance by heavy cavalry.

Tournament between Henry II and Lorges, 16th century

Tournament between Henry II and Lorges, 16th century

Tournament field for this competition was fenced by “estacas” – wooden posts which formed sort of palisade and land within this fence was called “estacada” (tournament’s arena sort of). During tournaments, after competition was over only knight which felt from his horse (often heavily wounded) left on that land and victorious knight used to leave arena without helping or paying attention to one which stayed on the field. From this takes origin phrase “dejar a alguien en la estacada” which in modern language used to refer to “leaving someone in difficult or dangerous situation”.

What about English version? As you can see Spanish idiom has rather military origin and its English equivalent despite having similar meaning in modern usage has completely different origins. It also revolves around of the place where you left the troubled person – “lurch”. And honestly I had to look it up as I haven’t had an idea about what it could be. Dictionaries list number of meanings of which, knowing sense of the phrase, you may guess that one which we have in the phrase “to leave someone in the lurch” is this:

“a decisive defeat in which an opponent wins a game by more than double the defeated player’s score especially in cribbage

I also found interesting blog post which offers more interesting and fitting options for origins of lurch, such as:

1. Lurch is a noun that originated from lich – the Old English word for corpse. Lych-gates were the roofed churchyard entrances that adjoin many old English churches and are the appointed place for coffins to be left when waiting for the clergyman to arrive to conduct a funeral service. Hence ‘left in the lych/lurch’ supposed to mean “left in a quite difficult situation”…

Lychgate at the Church of St. James the Less, Philadelphia

Lychgate at the Church of St. James the Less, Philadelphia

2. Second theory states that jilted brides would be ‘left in the lurch’ when the errant bridegroom failed to appear for a wedding.

Those two seems to be apt/interesting yet only listed as suggested explanations with no evidence to support them.

And while most of the dictionaries link the lurch with losing/bad situation in cribbage aforementioned blog post mentioned above suggests that word/phrase “originates from the French board game of lourche or lurch, which was similar to backgammon and was last played in the 17th century (the rules having now been lost). Players suffered a lurch if they were left in a hopeless position from which they couldn’t win the game.” But again, looking at illustration they have there game board looks similar to the one for cribbage.

And after looking at both Spanish and English idioms which convey one idea yet have different origins I realized that both cribbage board and jousting tournament field have something in common…

Modern 120-hole cribbage board

Modern 120-hole cribbage board

Giovanni Ferri, Saracen joust in Piazza Navona in the 25th of February 1634 (Seventeenth century)

Giovanni Ferri, Saracen joust in Piazza Navona in the 25th of February 1634 (Seventeenth century)

Don’t you think?

Russian version anyone? If you interested in a Russian equivalent of “dejar a alguien en la estacada” / “leave someone in the lurch” I think it will be “бросить на произвол судьбы”, phrase which literal translation goes as “to leave someone to the arbitrariness of fate”… As you can see yet again completely different phrase to convey the same idea. Russian phrase centered around “fate” which is blind and not in a sense of unbiased Themis (known to Russian speakers as “Фемида” [Femida] and aka Justitia aka Lady Justice), but rather blind in its cruel arbitrariness. So to leave on  to the arbitrariness of fate would be leaving vulnerable person in really difficult situation.

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When code and operations collide :)

I’ve just seen CBT Nuggets video on YouTube entitled “How to Transition to DevOps” and though I cancelled their subscription quite some time ago it sparked my interest and made it very tempting to subscribe again (if only not my financial and time budget constraints).

I really like expressive quotes and explanations which use analogy and one from this video which I really liked can be found below. Along with some basic theory on what is and how to approach DevOps in this video Shawn Powers shows little demo which demonstrates how to use Chef recipe for configuration management, and next goes the following conclusion:

“…configuration automation is awesome example of how DevOps is kind of taking two different worlds the world of installing packages and uploading files and code which allows us to programmatically solve problems and put them together kind of like peanut butter and chocolate goes together to make a Reese’s Cup and it’s you know awesome it’s better than the sum of its parts…”

Nice. And I also need to try these Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups now even if it a bit violates healthy diet 🙂 Think it goes well with coffee and IT training videos (if consumed in limited amounts).

I just looked at DevOps courses available at CBT Nuggets at the moment and though it seems there is no DevOps overview/general course available so far they already have courses on specific tools (Puppet, Chef, Docker, Ansible).

 

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