Category Archives: How-to

How to identify an empty K2 role

In some scenarios you may have empty K2 roles with no users added, and in the past it was possible to create new role in K2 Management without adding any users into it or delete all users from the role (this is not the case in current versions of K2). When you have K2 role with no users K2 will be logging error shown below on each attempt to resolve this role (look at Interval configured for this role in DestQueue table to get an idea about error frequency, and the same will be logged every time when role used as a destination etc.):

“1 The K2.net 2003 Destination Queue SecurityLabel provider ” does not exist at K2DestQueue.RunDestQueue(Object obj)”

To address/remove that error you need to identify empty role first which can be done with help of the following SQL query run against K2 DB:

Once empty role identified you either delete it or add some user into it to get rid of error message, or as a third option you can increase its refresh interval in DestQueue table to decrease frequency with which this error will be logged in K2 host server logs.

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Unable to add HTTPS binding for SSRS 2014

I recently bump into an issue with HTTPS binding configuration for SSRS 2014. Instance was not touched for quite some time and self-signed HTTPS certificate expired. I generated new one and was trying to add new binding but SSRS console was keep removing HTTPS binding immediately after adding it with “We were unable to create the certificate binding.” message. I believe it was accompanied by HRESULT: 0x80040241. Internet is full of information on the problem and it looks like this thread, for example contains exhaustive list of things you need to check. But basically it turned out that beyond review and manual clean up of urlacls (netsh http show urlacl / netsh http delete urlacl) it was also necessary to copy my self-signed PS generated certificate from machine Personal store into machine Trusted root certificates store (hint was found here).

In a nutshell: when adding SSRS binding fails you need to know that those are not represented nowhere in IIS GUID, update your certificate (remove old, add new and be sure it is trusted on a Trusted Root level), next be sure you use right (non occupied by other services) ports and host names clearing up SSL reservations if necessary ( netsh http show urlacl / netsh http delete urlacl). Read error message you have and drill down into details to see error code – despite not showing its site and bindings in IIS console SSRS console does everything it can to say you what’s wrong / why it can’t proceed with adding binding, though I do admit underlying infrastructure of scattered configs and urlacls reservation can be intimidating at times.

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How to collect process dump with LeakTrack information using ProcDump + Debug Diagnostic Tool

Just a short note on how to collect process dump including LeakTrack information.

Download latest version of Microsoft Debug Diagnostic Tool, at the moment it is Debug Diagnostic Tool v2 Update 3 and install it going through an installation wizard steps as shown below:

Debug Diagnostics Installation Wizard Page 1
Debug Diagnostics Installation Wizard Page 2
Debug Diagnostics Installation Wizard Page 3
Debug Diagnostics Installation Wizard Page 4
Debug Diagnostics Installation Wizard Page 5

Once installation wizard completes, download ProcDump and unzip it on the server where you going to collect dump file. Next, run DebugDiag 2 Collection:

DebugDiag 2 Collection icon in Start Menu

Cancel out initial “Select Rule Type” dialog:

Debug Diagnostic Tool – Select Rule Type

Navigate to Processes tab select process for which you need to collect
LeakTrack, right click on it and select Monitor For Leaks:

Debug Diagnostic Tool – Monitor For Leaks

Click Yes in “Do you want to enable ‘Service Mode’ and continue” pop up:

Debug Diagnostic Tool – Enable Service Mode

You will see confirmation that monitoring for leak has started:

Debug Diagnostic Tool – Monitoring for leaks in the specified process

Now let it run and wait till the process you monitor use up large amount of RAM and take dump using procdump.exe, you can see some hints on the command line syntax below:

Script to run procdump.exe

Once dump taken you can stop monitoring for leaks and close Debug Diagnostic tool:

Debug Diagnostic Tool – Stop Monitoring For Leaks

After following steps above your process memory dump should contain LeakTrack information. You can tell that by the dump file size – if you take a dump without enabling Monitor For Leaks option in Debug Diagnostic Tool at the same time you will see that your dump file size will be smaller if compared with one which you take while running Monitor For Leaks .

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How to take process dump using CDB

Just a short explanation of how to take process dump using CDB.

First you need to get Debugging Tools for Windows. To get Debugging Tools as a standalone tool set you can just download Windows SDK and during installation select Debugging Tools for Windows:

Installing Debugging Tools for Windows

Once Debugging tools for Windows are downloaded and installed you can find cdb.exe in the following location – C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\Debuggers\x64 (note that number highlighted in bold may vary depending on SDK version installed – in my case it is 10, and you obviously have cdb.exe for different platforms – x86/x64 etc. – just navigate to appropriate subfolder of Debuggers folder).

To take dump launch CMD in elevated mode, switch directory to CDB location and execute cdb -p <PROCESS PID> to take crash dump (remember that PID information can be found in Task Manager or retrieved with PowerShell using Get-Process “%ProcessName%” | select -expand id):

CDB attaching to the process by PID

At this stage CDB is attached to process and closing this CMD window will terminate process you are attached to. Once CDB is loaded type in the following commands:

..loadby sos clr

!Thread

You will receive “No export Thread found” error – it can be ignored, and some more commands needs to be executed. First run !StopOnException -create System.StackOverflowException it may not work from the first attempt, just re-run it once again until you see confirmation that breakpoint was created:

CDB set breakpoint

Once breakpoint is set type gn and wait for process crash:

When process crashed the following commands have to be executed:

.logopen C:\dumps\k2hostserver.log

!ClrStack

.logclose

.dump /ma /u C:\dumps\process.dmp

gn

gn

….

Repeat typing gn until you get “there is no debugee” message. Your dump will be written in the location you specified above (C:\dumps\process.dmp).

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PowerShell Script – Detect installed SQL Server Version and switch to appropriate setup directory

Some time ago I wrote a blog post where I explained how to change SQL Server instance collation for installed SQL server instance (see “Changing SQL collation for deployed instance without reinstall (almost)“). That post contained some scripting bits to detect installed SQL Server version and navigate to appropriate setup directory to facilitate collation change process. Recently I had a bit of time to consolidate these bits of PowerShell into one script which detects installed SQL Server version and changes directory to appropriate setup folder. Here you have it:

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